Bonehead Of The Day

I wish Carol Costello would, just once, name names.

Like on health care reform — instead of telling Americans exactly what he wanted in a health care bill, President Obama left it up to lawmakers. Republicans used the President’s strategy to create fear and confusion among voters. It also fueled the tea party movement.

All is not lost. For some, there is still a sense change will come. Recent polls show overwhelming support for the President remains high among African-Americans, even though standing in the unemployment line.
Carol Costello, CNN American Morning, 1/19/10

“For some….”

For years, Carol Costello’s been using that phrase to justify every stupid premise she wanted to discuss. I could say, “Some people think Carol Costello is a twit.” I’m pretty sure she’d demand to know who those people were.

And as for African Americans showing overwhelming support for Barack Obama, even while standing in an unemployment line, I’d be willing to bet Carol Costello doesn’t know many. If she did, maybe she could hook some up with a job at CNN.

Doubt it.

About The Author

  • PB-in-AL

    -”And say what you will about Saddam I am quite sure there are a lot of Iraqis who are looking back fondly about those times.” – I agree, that’s my point there are plenty of folks back in Germany in the late ’40s who lamented of how the trains used to run on time. I might not have been clear, a people have to WANT freedom more than their own comfort to be willing to fight for it. I understand what you say about the fear of death FOR voting, but it goes beyond voting. This has to be the way you want to LIVE.

    -”Can you imagine the same thing happening in America?” – Nowadays, I dont know. I thought about mentioning it, but tried to keep on a narrower subject line. I’m not sure our youth understand what things ought to be like, Constitutionally, enough to want to fight for it. But I think there are enough of us that are, shall we say, lesser youth who are willing through the aches and creaks to stand up and say enough! I think that’s what the Tea Parties were about.

    -”Canaries” – no, I didn’t miss it. By way of example, my church works with the ONLY completely free to the people homeless shelter on the west side of town. It’s run by a small black independent church with a pastor of unmitigated energy and character. It sits literally 40 yards from the largest black congregation in the area who are building a addition costing at least several hundred thousand dollars.

    The big church can’t be bothered with the shelter. The big church is a historic icon in the area, MLK spoke there. Yet they refuse to be involved in attempts by other churches’ and associations’ attempts at local racial reconciliation.

    My point is one of these churches represents the black status quo; the other represents Christ to the neighborhood, to the homeless, to whoever will listen. One continues to fan the flames of historic resentments; the other said, yeah it’s bad, what can I do to change it, and he is…changing lives, daily.

    This shelter (and the pastor) is no respecter of race. What meager offering it has to the homeless is open to anyone in need. He looked at the status quo and realized it wasn’t working. He didn’t wait for the government to approve or OK it. He doesn’t really care if anyone else is on board. THAT is what will change our communities.

    Yes, the black community can be seen as a sort of litmus test. Frankly, the lefties have been experimenting on the black community for years. They seem to think they have the recipe right to serve it up to everyone now.

    As to your question regarding the fortitude of America at large to oppose it… well that remains to be seen. At times it seems America just wants to watch American Idol or how the next celebrity tittie will pop out; other times, like the spontaneous proliferation of the Tea Parties seem to indicate there are enough AMERICANS (irrespective of race) who are willing to stand up and say Enough! I hope there are more of the latter; most of the people I know are.

    -”In any case nothing will be done as both Republicans and Democrats are swift to point the finger of blame when in fact I think both are responsible in “not to listen(ing), as it only affected black people”, otherwise wouldn’t it have been a national emergency?”

    Considering all the folks in the video, does the black community itself bear any responsibility for putting these folks in power and keeping them there? Now, I’m not saying that the Republicans don’t have plenty of responsibility to carry around either. But the Democrats are the ones passing themselves off as “for the little guy, for the minority communities, etc.” Seems to me that the black community might be a bit more proactive in holding these folks to account. Or is it OK that Charlie Rangel “forgot” about that additional cool million that he’s worth? Is it OK that Rep Johnson “happened” to have a freezer full of somebody else’s cash? Or that Bawny Fwank….

    The black community acts as the largest monolithic voting bloc in the country, IMO. But they’re not paying attention. Bob brings this up ALL the time. These politicians are lying, why keep voting for them? But they do.?! And sure this isn’t a black-only issue, but that’s the thread we’ve followed today.

    You ask if it would have been a national emergency otherwise. You tell me what happened fall 2008. Was that emergency enough? You said the black communities were a sign, canary in the mine, maybe so. But there were plenty of people asking to pull the canary up and examine it, maybe not specifically citing the black community, but the results of investigation and correction would have benefitted all. But no, these criminals in congress (I am being non-partisan) who wanted to keep oversight and accountability out pressed on to the detriment of all.

    In closing I appreciate what Bob, Lloyd Marcus, and many others, maybe yourself Dratster, do to effect change in the mindset that skin color determines this stuff. To reframe what I closed with before, we, as AMERICANS, need to be willing to discuss these issues (as we are here) without resorting to playground name calling. The point I tried, and failed it seems, to make about referencing Iraq and Iran, is that Americans don’t generally sit about and complain, we do something to effect change. That’s why we’re seen as arrogant, we aren’t willing to accept what others say we are.

    Well, so be it. I am American; I believe that this can change. I’m tired of the whining, everywhere. I’m working with folks in my town to make a change. I’m voting in an informed way. I’m attempting, intentionally, to help bridge the gaps that have traditionally separated people. In my area that is dealing with the black/white race issue. One person building relationships one at a time is what makes this change. It can’t be legislated.

    I hope this makes sense. I’ve typed it on and off throughout the day. Cheers all.

  • dratster

    –They’ve been liberated, but do they want to do the hard work to stay that way… kinda’ looks like not.

    These are people who vote under fear of death! Look at our country, in Mass think they estimated 30% of eligible voters voted…. And say what you will about Saddam I am quite sure there are a lot of Iraqis who are looking back fondly about those times. I see them as standing up pretty well with all the suffering that they have had to endure over the past 7 years.

    Can you imagine the same thing happening in America?

    –Excuses have to stop…

    I think you missed my point about “canary in a mine shaft”, think there was ample warning about our current situation and many did not heed the warnings.

  • dratster

    –The fact little has changed cannot be blamed on Republicans. Go there and you’ll lose all respect.

    Sheesh, even when I admit that misguided Democratic policies were partially responsible for the pathology that we see in the Black community, you somehow read into my post as an indictment of Republicans…

    –Democrats chose not to listen, as it only affected black people.
    Am i incorrect in remembering that the Congress was controlled by Republicans until Jan 2007?

    Again, we were seeing the larest drop in Black income, the largest drop in Black home ownership and the largest increase in Black unemployment.

    Yet you want to lay ALL the blame at the feet of the Democrats?

    You missed the point completely that the Black community has felt that Democrats , rightly or wrongly, are more aligned with protecting their interests. But after seeing your video I would have to say that I was shocked by what I saw from the democratic congressmen

    –President Clinton had a Republican House and Senate that kept him responsible with spending, a discipline they later forgot.

    I dispute that as being the reason that individual Blacks and Black-owned business saw the level of gains that they did in the early to mid-1990s -

    “In August 1993, Clinton signed the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which passed Congress without a Republican vote. It cut taxes for fifteen million low-income families, made tax cuts available to 90% of small businesses,[48] and raised taxes on the wealthiest 1.2% of taxpayers.[49] Additionally, through the implementation of spending restraints, it mandated the budget be balanced over a number of years.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Clinton

    In any case nothing will be done as both Republicans and Democrats are swift to point the finger of blame when in fact I think both are responsible in “not to listen(ing), as it only affected black people”, otherwise wouldn’t it have been a national emergency?

  • PB-in-AL

    “The subprime debacle really started for the Black community in 2005, a good two years before the rest of the country was savaged by it in 2007 and 2008.

    Yet seemingly nobody started to sound the alarms.”

    Many did.

    The videos of Waters and Fwanks are the ones that came to my mind immediately. After seeing them again, this far along after their demise(ish) to see Maxine Waters say, “…under his OUTSTANDING leadership…” just kicks my blood pressure up.

    Republicans used the President’s strategy to create fear and confusion among voters. It also fueled the tea party movement.” – Oh yeah, the Repubs were still trying to regroup and figure out what happened for most of the year. The MSM is who is responsible for the “fear and confusion”. The Tea Parties were the expression of beginning clarity and sense of purpose. I still have no faith in the Republican party, any more than I do the Democrat. We need people who are truly conservative in political AND moral stature. Sure Brown is better than Croakley, but he better remember who he’s working for, as they all should.

    @Dratster – “How does a community survive when children grow up without a family structure to guide and protect them?” You’re right, but when has any people group who was ever “saved” out of their horrible situation, without their own willing participation ever stayed “saved”? Look at Iraq and Afghanistan. They’ve been liberated, but do they want to do the hard work to stay that way… kinda’ looks like not. The black community has to be WILLING to listen to folks like Bob, you, The Machine, Alan West, Allen Keyes, etc. who know there is a better way, but you gotta’ want it.

    “Po’ mouthin’” is a situation that trancends race. In Alabama I have seen some of the poorest of folks, regardless of race. I have also seen some of the children of these folks graduate from college and succeed. But they didn’t do it by whining. It takes hard work.

    Dratster, I’m not discounting your experience or observations, but the excuses have to stop. Your last paragraph is entirely correct. The problem is they have removed themselves so far from reality that there is no common ground, it seems. We all know what a conservative Tea Party person might believe. Where can that person meet on issues with even a “moderate” Democrat”?

    So 2 issues as I see this thread: (1) the black people as a group in America have to want to succeed, (2) somehow we have to regain the ability to have political DISCUSSION, two way, no name calling, no gauntlet throwing. Your prediction can come true in either of these issues for want of these two things.

    Sorry for the length of post, but it’s where I am today.

  • http://black-and-right.com Bob

    First of all, the black community has been run by the Democrats they voted for for decades. The fact little has changed cannot be blamed on Republicans. Go there and you’ll lose all respect.

    “During the 1990’s under President Clinton the black community saw the largest economic improvement ever during the preceding 40 years.”

    President Clinton had a Republican House and Senate that kept him responsible with spending, a discipline they later forgot.

    “The subprime debacle really started for the Black community in 2005, a good two years before the rest of the country was savaged by it in 2007 and 2008.

    Yet seemingly nobody started to sound the alarms.”

    Many did.

    http://www.nmatv.com/video/471/Democrats-Covering-Up-Fannie-Mae-Freddie-Mac-Scam

    Democrats chose not to listen, as it only affected black people.

  • dratster

    –And as for African Americans showing overwhelming support for Barack Obama, even while standing in an unemployment line, I’d be willing to bet Carol Costello doesn’t know many

    With all due respect, I would be willing to bet that many of the people who come on this website can be characterrized as “not knowing many” as well.

    In fact I am sometimes amused by the postings of some here as they rail about the racism from the Blacks; is that from real experience or just a perception?

    Folks, it ain’t racism, it’s ignorance and jealousy.

    The real problem has been that the Black community has been for the past 40+ years the “canary in the cage” when it comes to aspects of the American dream that are failing.

    The only problem is that most of America has been ignoring these warnings.

    In 1964 Patrick Moynihan was considered a racist because he sounded the alarm about the “harmful” effects on the Black family from the policies of the “Great Society” .

    At that time we saw 20% out-of-wedlock births in the black community; now we hover somewhere near 70%. How does a community survive when children grow up without a family
    structure to guide and protect them? Is it a wonder why so many of these unneducated and undereducated kids end up in the criminal justice system? Folks, it’s a warning.

    Why is the Black community so aligned with Democrats despite Republican claims to have been the real champions of civil rights?

    During the 1990′s under President Clinton the black community saw the largest economic improvement ever during the preceding 40 years.

    But from 2000 thru 2007 the Black community saw the largest decline of any group while the nation as a whole saw an increase in its economic fortunes.

    The subprime debacle really started for the Black community in 2005, a good two years before the rest of the country was savaged by it in 2007 and 2008.

    Yet seemingly nobody started to sound the alarms.

    Ten years ago I wrote to the San Jose Mercury News about my opposition to Congress’s intent on increasing the number of H1-B’s.

    The unemployment rate in the Black and Hispanic communities was standing at 10% or higher. I advocated a vigorous training program that would help those young people gain entry into good paying positions.

    This past year I worked as a consultant at a major defense contractor where the running joke amongst my coworkers was that too many people mistook me for the “other Black guy”.

    I would literally have multiple conversations each week where someone would belatedly realize that I wasn’t “George”.

    The really sad thing was that these coworkers – 99% of them – were Green Card holders or new US citizens formerly from India.

    IMHO, it is the height of irony that people are ready to burn President Obama in effigy as the nation hovers at 10% unemployment but fails to realize or remember that there is a group of Americans who have been living this nightmare for the past ten years.

    So I don’t think it is too much of a stretch for this “Democratic White” correspondent to guess that many in the Black community are still in President Obama’s corner after only one year in office.

    In either case I think that if both Republicans and Democrats do not stop all of the political finger-pointing and back stabbing, we won’t have to worry about the threat from the outside, we will be worried more about the complete destruction of our society.

  • Igor

    Once more into the “Well, the Prez has high popularity ratings, so he must be a good/successful President, right?” line of thinking (or, actually, wishing)…

    Just another stupid talking head. Nothing but vacuum between the headsets, fer sure.

    Igor

  • Idl

    All is not lost because he still has the support of unemployed blacks?! Is she deranged? Unfortunately, African-American support is a given, unless Obama punches babies on live tv someday. Also, it’s just one demographic. You need just a little more support than that, sweetheart.

  • http://sgthartsock.blogspot.com/ Nicolas

    this racist generalizing boob obvioulsy hasn’t met guys like you Bob, Kevin Jackson, or Zo, and DEFINITELY not the chairwoman of the National Black Republican Association, Frances Rice